The curious story of Burgos street about the canon who created a hospital

The curious story of Burgos street about the canon who created a hospital
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Barrantes Street is one of those streets in the city that takes us to the beginning of the 20th century. Classicist, with noble, civil and religious buildings, combined with low-rise homes and a leafy variety of trees. It is dedicated to Pedro Barrantes Aldana, canon of the Cathedral, died on August 9, 1658.

From Barrantes, the could make one more saint. Upon his death he ordered the construction of a hospital, that of San Julián and San Quirce. It was Jerónimo Pardo who founded it by order of Barrantes, as a benefactor. Today it is a residence for the elderly, but for years it was another hospital clinic in the city.

The old hospital is not the only important building on the street. The monastery and church of the Salesian mothers is another of the most beautiful in the city. Neo-Gothic in style, the tower and the church of Salesas have not been valued by the people of Burgos as they deserve. It is one of the most notable examples of architecture of the 20th century. It is the work of the architect Juan Bautista Lázaro who designed this church, dedicated to The Visitation; Its tower is the work of Juan Moya Idígoras. The Salesas convent has been inhabited by this congregation since 1901.

Two enormous giant sequoia trees from Canada greet visitors and detract from the sight of the church tower. A church that, inside and out, deserves a leisurely visit.

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The temple was built “on a small promontory that was in the place where the beautiful temple is today,” remembers Gregorio Carmona in his book ‘History of the old rúas burgenses’. On that elevation “the Casa de Caridad existed until the end of the last century, the land of which this community acquired to build its residence, which was on Fernán González street, in front of the arch of this count of Castile,” notes the historian.

The gardens of the Palacio de la Isla, the Muguiro family’s, also face this street. The Liniers and Muguiro families, of noble Madrid descent, built their mansions between 1879 and 1883 from the palace-houses of the Liniers and Muguiro families on the Paseo de la Isla and marked the beginning of the use of the city’s green spaces for the construction of homes and hotels.

The Casa del Empresario building also has a wing on the street, designed by the architect José Moliner Vaquero in 1927.

Barrantes street is accessed from Águeda street, Martínez del Campo and Paseo de los Cubos to the north; and from Plaza de Castilla, Aparicio and Ruiz, Paseo de la Isla and Paseo de la Audiencia, to the south.

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