Why is Labor Day celebrated? These are the origins of May 1

Why is Labor Day celebrated? These are the origins of May 1
Descriptive text here
-

May 1 is an emblematic date in the Spanish work calendar as it is the Labor Day, a day that is celebrated throughout the country with demonstrations and commemorative events. But what is the origin of this holiday?

Labor Day has its origin in 19th century labor movement in the United States when the American Federation of Labor promoted a general strike in 1886 to require an eight-hour work day compared to the 12 and 18 hours that were worked. The protesters demanded “eight hours of work, eight hours of rest and eight hours of leisure” and, under this maxim, more than 300 demonstrations were called, joined by 88,000 workers in Chicago.

The demonstrations continued for several days, resulting in the deaths of several members of the security forces and multiple protesters, popularly known as the “Chicago Martyrs.” This event triggered a wave of mobilizations around the world, including Spain, where workers demanded fairer and more dignified working conditions.

WORKER’S DAY IN SPAIN

In Spain, the workers, especially in sectors such as mining, construction and the textile industry, They faced grueling work hours, low wages, and dangerous working conditions, so the fight for labor rights became a priority for many Spanish workers. The first Worker’s Day in Spain was celebrated on May 1, 1889, three years after the general strike in the United States.

-
Unions and labor organizations take advantage of this day to make labor problems visible and demand measures

That day two demonstrations took place in Madrid, one socialist and the other anarchist, bringing together thousands of people. Other cities in Spain held demonstrations for Labor Day on May 1, but many of them were violent, attracting the intervention of the Civil Guard. Despite the riots, these demonstrations set a precedent for celebrating Labor Day.

Officially, it was during the Second Republic when May 1 was established as a national holiday in 1931. However, Franco abolished it after the coup d’état. Finally, the national holiday was reestablished with the arrival of democracy in 1975.

In contemporary Spain, Worker’s Day continues to be a date of great relevance that remembers history and the challenges faced by the working class. Despite advances in labor rights, job insecurity, unemployment and inequality continue to be realities that affect many workers in the country.

Unions and labor organizations They take advantage of May 1 to make these problems visible and demand measures that guarantee stable jobs, decent wages and safe working conditions. The demonstrations and rallies taking place in cities across Spain are a reminder that the fight for labor rights continues to be a priority.

-

-

PREV 4-year-old girl dies in Arequipa from burns, after cell phone explosion (VIDEO) | EDITION
NEXT La Domadora y el León Craft Beer, Soup Day Point at the great Garage Beer Co international party